CRW matchup question


#1

JB, can you please tell me why CRW is 8 regions? I do not understand the logic here.

Also, why mix up the servers? Seems like it would make more sense to have EN with EN, RUS with RUS and so forth.

My english region saw ■■■, DE, RUS this past weekend. Event chat was very boring cause no one could understand the other. And I am not sure but I believe I may have been sold as bride to one of the russians.

I am registered at Scopley if anyone would like to get me a wedding gift.


#2

The first CRW was between 2 regions, resulting in a bunch of regions/factions complaining about biased matchmaking due to difference in activity levels. After that I believe we’ve had a CRW with 4 regions and the complaints were quite similar. I’m fine with 8 and I’m fine with regions from different continents, but they should really re-structure the prizes. 8 regions means 3rd place factions from every region would usually end up getting total crap because there’s simply that many factions with poorly structured prizes.


#3

I prefer 8 regions as well but I just wished the prizes were restructured to match the increased number of factions.


#4

Maybe if they changed the prize structure I could get on board with 8 regions. My question was “why 8”? Who came up with that number? You go from 2 to 4 to 8. No middle ground?

And I still don’t care for the mixed servers.

I remember the whole Maggie CRW fiasco, but isnt there still room for improvement? 8 aint it.

8v8 or 6v6 in war. Why those numbers? Why not just make it 7v7?


#5

Why is a circle called a circle?


#6

Camps have to split evenly so it has to be an even number. Cant have one camp with 3 and the other with 4, that ain’t look right lol.


#7

Why is a circle called a circle?

The circle is a conic section obtained by the intersection of a cone with a plane perpendicular to the cone’s symmetry axis. It is also a Lissajous curve. A circle is the degenerate case of an ellipse with equal semimajor and semiminor axes (i.e., with eccentricity 0). The interior of a circle is called a disk.

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Circle.html

You had to ask. Now my brain hurts. :wink:


#8

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